My name's Macy, like the department store.

dailyotter:

The Naughty Otter

The British Film Institute uploaded this video yesterday, filmed around 1916, of a mischievous and apparently domesticated otter. The BFI writes:

This delightful glimpse of an unusually tame otter was captured by American-born filmmaker and entrepreneur Charles Urban, and may have been part of his ‘Curious Pals’ series of animal films. Having relocated to England, Urban returned to the US in 1916 to help encourage his country’s entry into the First World War; he made several films during the visit.

Submitted by Simon!

Via: dailyotter
pbsnature:

Meet Otter 501: http://youtu.be/x-3ECtObdH0

pbsnature:

Meet Otter 501: http://youtu.be/x-3ECtObdH0

Via: pbsnature

gracehelbig:

mikerugnetta:

pbsnature:

A three-day old abandoned female sea otter pup is rescued by the Monterey Bay Aquarium. “Saving Otter 501” airs on NATURE on PBS on Wednesday, Oct 16: http://youtu.be/x-3ECtObdH0

AAAAHHHH

I repeat, AAAAHHHH.

Source: pbsnature Via: naruhodos
dailyotter:

Otter and a Little Girl Stop to Get a Good Look at Each Other
Via Missouri Division of Tourism

dailyotter:

Otter and a Little Girl Stop to Get a Good Look at Each Other

Via Missouri Division of Tourism

Via: dailyotter
wired:

For several days this week, these two tiny sea otter siblings were floating around on their mom’s belly in Morro Bay, in central California. Alternately nursing and being groomed, or occasionally floating beside her, the little furballs are a rare pair: Roughly 2 percent of sea otter pregnancies result in the birth of more than one pup.
The odds that both will survive are even longer.
“We know it’s kind of inevitable. A mom cannot raise two pups,” said Michelle Staedler, sea otter research coordinator for the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Sea Otter Research and Conservation program.
Normally, sea otters only give birth to one pup at a time. The first twin otters (.pdf) were only reported in 1986. Now, this pair has brought scientists and photographers to the chilly Morro Bay waters, straining pairs of eyes hoping to glimpse and study the otters as they rest and float near the kelp forests.
“They’re pretty rare situations,” Staedler said. “This is the fourth one that I know of.”
[MORE: Tiny Sea Otter Siblings Fight the Odds]

wired:

For several days this week, these two tiny sea otter siblings were floating around on their mom’s belly in Morro Bay, in central California. Alternately nursing and being groomed, or occasionally floating beside her, the little furballs are a rare pair: Roughly 2 percent of sea otter pregnancies result in the birth of more than one pup.

The odds that both will survive are even longer.

“We know it’s kind of inevitable. A mom cannot raise two pups,” said Michelle Staedler, sea otter research coordinator for the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Sea Otter Research and Conservation program.

Normally, sea otters only give birth to one pup at a time. The first twin otters (.pdf) were only reported in 1986. Now, this pair has brought scientists and photographers to the chilly Morro Bay waters, straining pairs of eyes hoping to glimpse and study the otters as they rest and float near the kelp forests.

“They’re pretty rare situations,” Staedler said. “This is the fourth one that I know of.”

[MORE: Tiny Sea Otter Siblings Fight the Odds]

Via: wired
dailyotter:

Otters Find Human’s Camera Fascinating
More at today’s Daily Otter post; via Beginners Blog Otter

dailyotter:

Otters Find Human’s Camera Fascinating

More at today’s Daily Otter post; via Beginners Blog Otter

Via: dailyotter
dailyotter:

Otter Pup Shows Off Her Feet
Via Das Otterhaus

dailyotter:

Otter Pup Shows Off Her Feet

Via Das Otterhaus

Via: dailyotter
dailyotter:

Just Another Day in the Life of Otters: A Bit of Lounging, a Bit of Climbing
Thanks, Karina!

dailyotter:

Just Another Day in the Life of Otters: A Bit of Lounging, a Bit of Climbing

Thanks, Karina!

Via: dailyotter
dailyotter:

Otter Relaxes on the Pool’s Edge

dailyotter:

Otter Relaxes on the Pool’s Edge